UACES Facebook Extension Homemakers Council clubs launch online campaign to provide 1 million meals
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April 23, 2020

Extension Homemakers Council clubs launch online campaign to provide 1 million meals

By Tracy Courage
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Fast Facts

  • 300+ EHC clubs partner with food banks to raise money to help food-insecure Arkansans
  • Statewide food drive begins April 23
  • Donations accepted through uaex.edu/EHC
  • Food banks see surge in demand as more Arkansans face food insecurity amid COVID-19 pandemic 

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LITTLE ROCK — The current COVID-19 pandemic may have forced a change in plans, but it hasn’t deterred members of the Arkansas Extension Homemakers Council from their goal of raising enough money to provide one million meals to Arkansans struggling with food insecurity.

THE DRIVE CONTINUES — The Arkansas Extension Homemakers Council kicked off an online food drive April 23 to provide food for needy families. Donations can be made via https://uaex.edu/EHC. The group is partnering with six Feeding America Food Banks across Arkansas, many of which have seen spikes in food requests as Arkansans face unemployment and income loss amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The council — one of Arkansas’ largest volunteer groups with more than 3,700 members statewide — kicked off an online food drive April 23 to provide food for needy families. Donations can be made via https://uaex.edu/EHC. The group is partnering with six Feeding America Food Banks across Arkansas, many of which have seen spikes in food requests as Arkansans face unemployment and income loss amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance, 17.3 percent of Arkansans were at risk of not knowing where to get their next meal, and 23.6 percent of children were food insecure before the pandemic. 

“The need is now more critical than ever,” said Roberta Shankle, of Hardy who is a member of the Hardy Country Ladies EHC and the statewide EHC meal drive coordinator. “We know many people are making do with less, and we ask people to just give as they feel led to give.” 

The council was already planning a statewide food drive before the pandemic. Last fall, the state’s 320 EHC clubs chose food insecurity as their statewide community service project and set a goal of raising enough money and collecting enough food to provide one million meals. 

Meals will be tracked based on buying power of the regional food banks, which buy large quantities of food, often for pennies on the dollar. At the Arkansas Food Bank, $1 provides five meals; at the Northwest Arkansas Food Bank, $1 provides as many as 10 meals. 

Before the pandemic, clubs were hosting food drives and donating supplies to food pantries and hunger relief organizations. The Hot Springs County Extension Homemakers, for example, donated 5,000 boxes of cereal and $1,000 to the Arkansas Food Bank. Though face-to-face events are canceled for now, EHC members hope their online crowdsourcing efforts will provide some relief to needy families. 

Donations are routed to the food bank of the donor’s choice. Partnering food banks include the Arkansas Food Bank, Food Bank of North Central Arkansas, Food Bank of North East Arkansas, Northwest Arkansas Food Bank, Harvest Regional Food Bank and River Valley Regional Food Bank. 

“By partnering with the area food banks, we can leverage our buying power,” Shankle said. “Ten dollars can buy a few items at your local store, but food banks can use that same $10 to purchase much more food, and that means more meals for needy families.” 

The fundraising effort comes at a critical time, as food banks are seeing a surge in request for services.

“During the spring of 2020, food banks have seen as much as a 50 percent increase in requests for our services,” said Jeff Quick, chief executive officer at the Food Bank of North Central Arkansas. “The COVID-19 crisis is unprecedented, and we anticipate an increased need for months, if not years to come, related to the economic impact of the crisis. The Feeding America Food Banks across the state are grateful for the support of the Extension Homemakers Clubs statewide. The support of these ladies will enable our food banks to serve thousands of Arkansans who are struggling with hunger and poverty. “ 

The Food Bank of North Central Arkansas, which serves 80 partner hunger relief organizations in nine Arkansas counties, is seeing more people who have lost their jobs or experienced a loss of hours and senior citizens and others who have difficulty accessing food through their local grocery stores and markets. 

Children who depend on meals at school have also been especially hard hit during this time, Quick said. 

“While 90 percent of our schools in Arkansas are providing grab and go meals, many children and their families have limited transportation that keeps them from accessing these meals,” he said. 

The EHC clubs will continue fundraising through 2021, said Karen Bell Fox, AEHC president.

“We have an ambitious goal, and we’re committed to this,” Fox said. “We believe that working together in a group we can have a powerful impact in our communities and our state by helping get food into the hands of those among us who are struggling.”

Hunger relief has been an ongoing effort in Extension Homemakers’ more than 100-year history. 

The clubs, formerly known as Home Demonstration Clubs, ran soup kitchens during the flu pandemic of 1918; they canned vegetables and donated surplus to families during the Great Depression; and they planted victory gardens to increase food supply during World War II. Before the federal school lunch program began, EHC clubs were providing lunches for children in rural communities. 

“Community service is one of the hallmarks of the Extension Homemakers Clubs,” said Laura Hendrix, associate professor at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service and EHC advisor. “They see a need, and they take action.” 

Last year, volunteers donated more than 325,000 hours of service. 

To learn more about Arkansas Extension Homemakers in your area, contact your local Cooperative Extension Service agent or visit www.uaex.edu. Follow us on Twitter at @UAEX_edu.

 

About the Division of Agriculture

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s mission is to strengthen agriculture, communities, and families by connecting trusted research to the adoption of best practices. Through the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, the Division of Agriculture conducts research and extension work within the nation’s historic land grant education system.

The Division of Agriculture is one of 20 entities within the University of Arkansas System. It has offices in all 75 counties in Arkansas and faculty on five system campuses.

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture offers all its Extension and Research programs and services without regard to race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

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Media contact:
Tracy Courage
Director, Communications Services
U of A System Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
(501) 671-2126
tcourage@uaex.edu 

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