UACES Facebook COVID-19 Myth Busting | Research-based facts about COVID-19
skip to main content

COVID-19 Myth Busting

Food and groceries

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that, “Currently, there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19” (USFDA, 2020). Unlike foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) viruses like norovirus and hepatitis A that often make people ill through contaminated food, SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, is a virus that causes respiratory illness and not gastrointestinal illness. Foodborne exposure to this virus is not known to be a route of transmission. 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that, “Currently, there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19” (USFDA, 2020).  

Before eating or preparing fresh fruits and vegetables, wash the produce under cold running tap water to remove any stuck-on dirt. This reduces bacteria that may be present. If there is a firm surface, such as on apples or potatoes, the surface can be scrubbed with a brush.

Consumers should not wash fruits and vegetables with detergent or soap. These products are not approved or labeled by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use on foods. You could ingest residues from soap or detergent absorbed on the produce (USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service). 

For the average consumer, research has shown that washing produce with tap water is just as effective as washing produce with any produce wash solutions that are on the market. There is currently no evidence that vinegar or vinegar solutions are effective in killing the COVID-19 virus. Washing produce in vinegar may also negatively change the texture and taste of your produce. Wash your produce under running water as recommended by the FDA. 

No. Leaving out groceries can increase the risk of food borne illnesses. There is currently no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person. This includes between people who are in close contact with one another (within about six feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. However, it’s always critical to follow the four key steps of food safety—clean, separate, cook, and chill – to prevent foodborne illness. Handwashing after putting away groceries, before preparing food and before eating are best practices to reduce transmission. 

https://www.fda.gov/food/food-safety-during-emergencies/food-safety-and-coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19 

https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/keep-food-safe.html

Leftovers should be reheated to 165 degrees to prevent foodborne illness. However, this does not prevent transmission of COVID-19, as it is not transmitted through food. 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that, “Currently, there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19” (USFDA, 2020). Unlike foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) viruses like norovirus and hepatitis A that often make people ill through contaminated food, SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, is a virus that causes respiratory illness and not gastrointestinal illness. Foodborne exposure to this virus is not known to be a route of transmission.  

No. The temperature of foods you eat has no effect on the COVID-19 virus.  Once inside our cells, the virus is protected from any extremes of temperature. 

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/25/chain-message/audio-shared-facebook-messenger-spreads-false-info/ 

No. The temperature of foods you eat has no effect on the COVID-19 virus.  Once inside our cells, the virus is protected from any extremes of temperature. 

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/25/chain-message/audio-shared-facebook-messenger-spreads-false-info/ 


Disinfecting/Sanitizing

CDC recommends handwashing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, using alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol when soap and water are not available. These actions are part of everyday preventive actions individuals can take to slow the spread of respiratory diseases like COVID-19.

• When washing hands, you can use plain soap or antibacterial soap. Plain soap is as effective as antibacterial soap at removing germs. 
• If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an FDA-approved alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. You can tell if the sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol by looking at the product label.

CDC does not encourage the production and use of homemade hand sanitizer products because of concerns over the correct use of the ingredients and the need to work under sterile conditions to make the product. Local industries that are looking into producing hand sanitizer to fill in for commercial shortages can refer to the World Health Organization guidance. Organizations should revert to the use of commercially produced, FDA-approved product once such supplies again become available.

• To be effective against killing some types of germs, hand sanitizers need to have a strength of at least 60% alcohol and be used when hands are not visibly dirty or greasy. 
 Do not rely on “Do It Yourself” or “DIY” recipes based solely on essential oils or formulated without correct compounding practices. 
• Do not use hand sanitizer to disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects. See CDC’s information for cleaning and sanitizing your home.

No. Always follow the instructions on household cleaners. Do not use disinfect sprays or wipes on your skin because it may cause skin and eye irritation. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are not intended for use on humans or animals. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are intended for use on hard, non-porous surfaces.

Splash-less bleach is a little thicker than regular household bleach and is less likely to splash, but the sodium hypochlorite concentration is only 1-5%. It isn’t strong enough to sanitize and disinfect, as the label warns. Splash-less bleach will not sanitize or kill the COVID-19 virus. 

For disinfecting surfaces, look for bleach that is marketed as disinfectant bleach. This bleach will sanitize surfaces, and kill COVID-19. Clorox has a list of products that are effective against COVID-19 on its website. 

https://www.asdwa.org/2016/06/03/regular-vs-splash-less-chlorine-for-disinfection/ 

https://www.clorox.com/resources/help-prevent-the-spread-of-coronavirus/ 

It is a good idea to wash your cloth face covering frequently, ideally after each use, or at least daily. Have a bag or bin to keep cloth face coverings in until they can be laundered with detergent and hot water and dried on a hot cycle. If you must re-wear your cloth face covering before washing, wash your hands immediately after putting it back on and avoid touching your face. Discard cloth face coverings that: 

  • No longer cover the nose and mouth
  • Have stretched out or damaged ties or straps
  • Cannot stay on the face
  • Have holes or tears in the fabric

 

It is not recommended to use a microwave to sanitize your fabric facemask. While some Ziplock and other branded sandwich bags are microwavable, this is not true for all brands and varieties. Microwaving your fabric facemask may degrade the material and reduce its effectiveness in reducing the number of respiratory droplets you produce when you breathe, cough, or sneeze.  

 

Disease Transmission

According to the CDC, COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person-to-person. The virus that causes COVID-19 spreads mainly from person-to-person:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about six feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms. 

The virus does not spread easily in other ways. It may be possible for COVID-19 to spread in other ways, but these are not thought to be the main ways the virus spreads. It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-covid-spreads.html

No. At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus (COVID-19) or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.

The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable in aerosols for up to three hours and on surfaces like copper for four hours, cardboard for 24 hours, and plastic and stainless steel for up to two to three days. The ability of the virus to remain on these surfaces varies under different conditions (e.g., temperature or humidity). If you think a surface may be infected, clean it with simple disinfectant to kill the virus and protect yourself and others. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. But this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. 

“No. The virus survives best on smooth surfaces. Porous materials, such as pet fur, tend to absorb and trap pathogens, making it harder to contract them through touch. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is no scientific evidence indicating that any animals in the United States, including pets, can spread COVID-19 or that they might be a source of infection in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratories has confirmed SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans) in one tiger at a zoo in New York. This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with COVID-19. Samples from this tiger were taken and tested after several lions and tigers at the zoo showed symptoms of respiratory illness. 

Public health officials believe these large cats became sick after being exposed to a zoo employee who was actively shedding virus. The zoo has been closed to the public since mid-March, and the first tiger began showing signs of sickness on March 27. All of these large cats are expected to recover. There is no evidence that other animals in other areas of the zoo are showing symptoms. 

USDA and CDC are monitoring the situation and working to support the state and local health departments and state animal health officials. State animal and public health officials will take the lead in making determinations about whether animals, either at this zoo or in other areas, should be tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. USDA will notify the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) of this finding. 

Anyone sick with COVID-19 should restrict contact with animals, out of an abundance of caution including pets, during their illness, just as they would with other people. Although there have not been reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. If a sick person must care for a pet or be around animals, they should wash their hands before and after the interaction. 

No evidence currently exists to suggest that the hair on our heads and bodies may be modes of COVID-19 transmission. Continuing regular, daily hygiene habits (including showering and washing your hair) will rid your hair of any contaminants, similar to using proper handwashing techniques.”

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person-to-person in respiratory droplets from someone who is infected. People who are infected often have symptoms of illness. However, recent studies suggest that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms (CDC). 

For these reasons, the best ways to protect yourself include: 

  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick 
  • Stay home as much as possible 
  • Put distance between yourself and other people
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often 

COVID-19 has been reported as being isolated from animals that were in close contact with people known to be infected with the virus, but there is no evidence that animals can transmit the virus to people. This holds true for animals in agriculture. 

https://www.uaex.edu/life-skills-wellness/health/covid19/animals.aspx

 

Personal Protection

The CDC has not recommended people who are well to wear gloves. The CDC has only recommended glove usage if you are caring for someone who is ill and while cleaning. Health officials are finding that most citizens aren’t following proper glove usage and can contaminate themselves through improper usage. It may cause a sense of false security and lead people to wash their hands less. The CDC still recommends that handwashing and social distancing are ways to protect yourself from COVID-19 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/disinfecting-your-home.html 

https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/is-wearing-gloves-an-effective-defense-against-covid19

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

 Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.

Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

Make your own mask following the Surgeon General's how-to video.

Yes. Wearing cloth face coverings is an additional public health measure people should take to reduce the spread of COVID-19. CDC still recommends that you stay at least 6 feet away from other people (social distancing), frequent hand cleaning and other everyday preventive actions. A cloth face covering is not intended to protect the wearer, but it may prevent the spread of virus from the wearer to others. This would be especially important if someone is infected but does not have symptoms. View CDC’s guidance on how to protect yourself

There is no evidence to suggest contact lens wearers are more at risk for acquiring COVID-19
than glasses wearers. Contact lens wearers should continue to practice safe contact lens wear and care hygiene habits. Always wash your hands with soap and water before handling contact lenses, properly clean your lenses between uses, and make sure to replace your contact lens case at least every three months.

https://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/protect-your-eyes.html

Currently there is no data or scientific evidence to suggest that healthy individuals who wear masks or face coverings will have serious health risks. Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children younger than 2 years of age, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cover without assistance. 

The CDC has stated masks can reduce the spread of COVID-19 by protecting others if someone is infected and not showing symptoms yet or if they remain asymptomatic. The CDC advises that everyone should wear a mask, when able, if they are outside of their home, especially in places where social distancing may not be possible (grocery stores, pharmacies). Staying home, frequent 20 second handwashing, and social distancing are still the best ways the CDC recommends to reduce the spread of COVID-19. 

From the CDC: Illness Prevention & Cloth Face Coverings 


Prevention/Treatment

No. Being able to hold your breath for 10 seconds or more without coughing or feeling discomfort does not mean that you are free from COVID-19 or any other respiratory-related illness. Currently, the only way to confirm that you have the virus is through a laboratory test. You cannot confirm it with this breathing exercise (WHO).  

No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.

The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment. However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics because bacterial co-infection is possible (World Health Organization). 

 No. At this time there is no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The FDA is working with vaccine developers and other researchers and manufacturers to help speed up the development and availability of medical products such as vaccines, antibodies, and drugs to prevent COVID-19. 

Currently, there are no FDA-approved or clinically proven therapies for treatment of COVID-19. At present, the FDA has not approved use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID19 prophylaxis.

If used, hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine should be restricted to patients who are admitted to hospitals with COVID-19 infections. The role of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in an individual patient’s care should be discussed with an infectious disease physician at the healthcare facility.

Chloroquine phosphate, when used without a prescription and supervision of a healthcare provider, can cause serious health consequences, including death. Clinicians and public health officials should discourage the public from misusing non-pharmaceutical chloroquine phosphate (a chemical used in home aquariums). Clinicians should advise patients and the public that chloroquine, and the related compound hydroxychloroquine, should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider as prescribed medications.

• Do not ingest aquarium use products or any other chemicals that contain chloroquine phosphate. These chemicals are not intended for human consumption and can lead to serious health consequences, including death.
• Medications like chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate should be taken only when prescribed by and under the supervision of your healthcare provider and always according to the instructions provided.
• Seek immediate medical attention if you are experiencing any unexpected symptoms after taking chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine by contacting your healthcare provider or your poison center (1- 800-222-1222).

 

Animals

Yes. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people, while others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels, and bats. Some coronaviruses, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals and do not infect humans. For example, bovine coronavirus causes diarrhea in young calves, and pregnant cows are routinely vaccinated to help prevent infection in calves. This vaccine is only licensed for use in cattle for bovine coronavirus and is not licensed to prevent COVID-19 in cattle or other species, including humans.

Dogs can get a respiratory coronavirus, which is part of the complex of viruses and bacteria associated with canine infectious respiratory disease, commonly known as “kennel cough.” While this virus is highly contagious among both domestic and wild dogs, it is not transmitted to other animal species or humans. 
Most strains of feline enteric coronavirus, a gastrointestinal form, are fought off by a cat’s immune system without causing disease. However, in a small proportion of these cats, the virus can cause feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a disease that is almost always fatal.

Other species, like horses, turkeys, chickens, and swine, can contract their own species-specific strains of coronavirus but, like the other strains mentioned above, they are not known to be transmissible to humans.

Yes. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratories has confirmed SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans) in one tiger at a zoo in New York. This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with COVID-19. Samples from this tiger were taken and tested after several lions and tigers at the zoo showed symptoms of respiratory illness.

Public health officials believe these large cats became sick after being exposed to a zoo employee who was actively shedding virus. The zoo has been closed to the public since mid-March, and the first tiger began showing signs of sickness on March 27. All of these large cats are expected to recover. There is no evidence that other animals in other areas of the zoo are showing symptoms.

USDA and CDC are monitoring the situation and working to support the state and local health departments and state animal health officials. State animal and public health officials will take the lead in making determinations about whether animals, either at this zoo or in other areas, should be tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. USDA will notify the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) of this finding.

Anyone sick with COVID-19 should restrict contact with animals, out of an abundance of caution including pets, during their illness, just as they would with other people. Although there have not been reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. If a sick person must care for a pet or be around animals, they should wash their hands before and after the interaction (USDA).

On April 22nd, 2020, The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) today announced the first confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) infection in two pet cats. These are the first pets in the United States to test positive for SARS-CoV-2. 

The cats live in two separate areas of New York state. Both had mild respiratory illness and are expected to make a full recovery. SARS-CoV-2 infections have been reported in very few animals worldwide, mostly in those that had close contact with a person with COVID-19. 

At this time, routine testing of animals is not recommended. Should other animals be confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the United States, USDA will post the findings. State animal health and public health officials will take the lead in making determinations about whether animals should be tested for SARS-CoV-2. 

Public health officials are still learning about SARS-CoV-2, but there is no evidence that pets play a role in spreading the virus in the United States. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals that may compromise their welfare. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals, including pets, could be affected. 

Until we know more, CDC recommends the following: 

  • Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.
  • Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.
  • Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet from other people and animals.
  • Avoid dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather.
  • If you are sick with COVID-19 (either suspected or confirmed by a test), restrict contact with your pets and other animals, just like you would around other people.

 When possible, have another member of your household care for your pets while you are sick.

Avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food or bedding.

If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wear a cloth face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.


2020 Economic Impact Payments

No. The federal government and state will not be counting the economic impact check as income. You will not pay taxes on it. 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

No. This is one-time money. If you qualified this year, you will not need to repay the money next year, even if that child no longer lives with you. 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

No. The economic impact payment will not impact the amount you owe in taxes or receive as a refund when you file your 2020 taxes in 2021.

 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news.

 

No. Not all of the economic impact payment is based on having children. People who meet income requirements can receive up to $1,200 as an individual or up to $2,400 if you filed jointly with your spouse. In addition, people are eligible for an additional $500 per child 16 years and younger. If you share custody of a child, the parent who claimed him or her on the most recent tax return will receive the $500.

 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

If you had a child since the last time you filed a tax return, you are still able to receive the $500 economic impact payment. However, you may have to wait until next year when you file your 2020 tax return to receive that $500 payment. The economic impact payment is considered a “refundable tax credit” on tax returns, which means you can claim your new child on next year’s return and receive the money regardless of how much you might owe in taxes.

 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

 Anyone who qualifies can receive the economic impact payment even if they have not been required to file tax returns in recent years. Non-filers can enter their information online at the IRS website, https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/economic-impact-payments.

 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

It can be hard to tell a scam apart from the real deal. The IRS does plan to mail a letter about the economic impact payment to a person’s last known address within 15 days after the economic impact payment is made. The letter will provide information about how the payment was made and how to report if the payment never made it to you. If someone contacts you and says you’ve been overpaid – watch out, it could be a scam. The IRS will not send you an overpayment and make you send the money back in cash, gift cards, or a money transfer.

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news

 

No. The economic impact payments are part of the 2020 CARES Act. The new law is not tied to the Census or your participation in filling out your 2020 Census. For more information about the Census, visit www.uaex.edu/census .

 

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/get-my-payment

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm975

https://www.dfa.arkansas.gov/news


Weather 

UV lamps should not be used to sterilize hands or other areas of skin as UV radiation can cause skin irritation. You can contract COVID-19, no matter how sunny or hot the weather is. Countries with hot weather have reported cases of COVID-19. To protect yourself, make sure you clean your hands frequently and thoroughly and avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose. (World Health Organization).  

 It is not yet known if weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months.  At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer.  There is much more to learn about how the virus spreads, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.


Origin

No. While two research labs do exist in Wuhan Province—the Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the Wuhan Institute of Virology—that is the only factual evidence put forth to assert this claim.  

In fact, in the scientific journal Nature Medicine, researchers concluded that “Our analyses clearly show that SARS-CoV-2 is not a laboratory construct or a purposefully manipulated virus.” Read the study here.

 No. An old video, showing the actual demolition of a wireless tower by protesters in Hong Kong, was purported to be evidence that 5G wireless towers were somehow the culprit of the COVID-19 virus. 

 

COVID-19 is caused by a coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in people and may different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats.  Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people. This occurred with MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, and now with the virus that causes COVID-19. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus

No. The word “corona” comes from the Latin word for “crown.” This descriptor is used because of the physical appearance of the virus under a microscope—it has a crown-like appearance with spikes sticking up.   

Drinking the beer will not give you COVID-19 and it also will not prevent you from getting COVID-19. The names are just a coincidence. Drinking alcohol does not protect you against COVID-19 and may be dangerous. Frequent or excessive alcohol consumption may increase your risk of health problems.  

 *Please note that this information could change as the science and understanding of the COVID-19 virus advances. We will continue to update this page as new scientific evidence is available.

Please 
contact bmader@uaex.edu or lbalis@uaex.edu with questions.

 

Top