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Moss Springs Berry Farm

The Lums are in their 13th year of operation, and have recently expressed an interest in adding primocane-fruiting blackberries to expand their season and to take advantage of the potential premium price for the fruit in the late season.  Because their excess Ouachita® blackberries are currently marketed to a local winery, cultivars like Prime-Ark® Traveler also may offer a premium marketing opportunity.  Because of their southern location, both pests and high temperatures are concerns if a primocane-fruiting system is adopted.

Farm Pictures

 

Close up of Overwintering Blackberry Plants Close up of Unopened bud on Terminal of Cane
Close up of overwintering blackberry plants on December 18, 2017. Close up of unopened bud on terminal of cane on December 18, 2017.
Lums Shed Awaiting a new Season Primocanes Pruned and Dormant
Lums shed awaiting a new season on December 18, 2017. Primocanes pruned and dormant on December 18, 2017.

 

View of top of Blackberry Plants Close up of Overwintering Blackberry Leaves
View of top of blackberry plants on December 18, 2017. Close up of overwintering blackberry leaves on December 18, 2017.

 

Blackberry Shorbet People talking Blackberry Rows
Visitors to Moss Springs Berry Farm are treated to home-made blackberry sherbet. Visitors at the farm on 6-6-17. Moss Springs Berry farm in production on 6-6-17.

 

Blackberry Close Up Eric Lum Picking Berries in Test Plots
A close up of a blackberry bush at the farm. Eric Lum picking berries on test plots on 6-6-17.

 

Blackberry Rows Blackberry Rows Blackberry Rows
Picture of blackberry rows taken by Terry on Janurary 10th 2017. Picture of blackberry rows taken by Terry on Janurary 10th 2017. Picture of blackberry rows taken by Terry on Janurary 10th 2017.

 

Farm Videos

Moss Springs Berry Farm News Video

00:01
>> Interviewer: They come for the berries.
00:02
They come for the treats.
00:03
They come for the experience.
00:05
Whatever the reason, folks from all over Northeast Texas come to Moss Springs Berry Farm to pick
00:10
blackberries and meet the farmer that grows them.
00:12
>> Eric Lum: I try to spend a little time with every family that comes in.
00:15
And I'll help them pick a few berries and answer their questions and talk to them about
00:20
what to pick and what not to pick.
00:22
It's just a neat experience to interact with them and get to see them see where produce
00:29
comes from, to understand that there's a vine out there that's growing the berry that they
00:33
saw at Sam's or Walmart or Brookshire's or somewhere like that.
00:38
>> Interviewer: Moss Springs Berry Farm is you pick, we pick.
00:41
The Lum family encourages folks to come pick their own blackberries, but if you can't,
00:45
they'll pick them for you.
00:46
Eric grows Ouachita thornless blackberries.
00:49
The fruit only lasts about four weeks.
00:51
So in the month of June this field is full of moms, dads, kids, and grandparents all
00:55
getting a feel for agriculture.
00:57
>> Sandy Tutt: It feels more personal.
00:59
It's an experience for me.
01:00
It's an experience for the kids.
01:02
It's like you're going back to your roots.
01:04
You know, it's teaching them things.
01:07
They're only two and three and 11.
01:09
And the fact that my two year old knows to pick the black ones instead of the red ones,
01:13
you know, he's learning.
01:14
>> Interviewer: Around 250 people have grabbed a little white basket and walked the rows
01:18
of this East Texas orchard this year.
01:20
They've picked about 3,000 pounds of blackberries.
01:23
When they're done picking, they head to the shed.
01:25
Blackberry sherbert, blackberry yogurt pops and blackberry lemonade await.
01:29
It's just part of the Lum family's Texas hospitality.
01:32
>> Belinda Lum: We encourage people to come out, both young and old.
01:35
We've had ages here today from two to 90.
01:38
What I love the most about it, it's just being out there and listening to the interaction
01:42
between the kids, the moms, the dads, the grandparents.
01:46
Nobody has their phone out.
01:47
Both hands are busy picking, and they're talking and interacting.
01:50
>> Eric Lum: What I enjoy seeing is when that little bitty child comes back, and they're
01:55
purple.
01:56
You know, their whole mouth is purple.
01:57
Their hands are purple.
01:59
Bless their hearts, their dresses are purple or whatever they have on, but they thoroughly
02:04
enjoy it.
02:05
And we enjoy having them.
02:06
>> It's a giant berry.
02:07
>> Interviewer: Eric retired as a County Extension Agent in Bowie County.
02:10
He planted his first blackberry plant in 2003.
02:13
He provides about 500 pounds of berries to a local winery, but most of his blackberries
02:17
go to his loyal customers.
02:19
For 12 years Eric and his family have helped people in Northeast Texas enjoy the fruits
02:24
of their labor.
02:25
For TFB News, Ed Wolff, New Boston.

 

Exchanging Bait Video

 

Jessica Lefors>>
00:00
We're just exchanging the lures, you have
00:02
to replace them once a month for the
00:04
spotted wing Drosophila. And all you do
00:06
is this is your old lure and you take it
00:10
off the hook and then you, this is the
00:14
new one,
00:15
take off the film on the back here
00:26
and then you fold it in half. And there's
00:28
two x's, two holes for it, and those go on
00:31
the hanger that come with the trap. And
00:37
that's it every month.

 

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