UACES Facebook Mediterranean Diet is a Lifestyle Approach to Healthy Eating

Mediterranean Diet is a Lifestyle Approach to Healthy Eating

Join us for our hands-on workshop where you will prepare and taste recipes typical of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea.

TEXARKANA, Ark. –

May is National Mediterranean Diet Month. A month to learn more about why US News ranked it #1 in Best Diets Overall. The Mediterranean Diet is a lifestyle approach to healthy eating that includes a balanced variety of foods and daily exercise. It is based on the foods and drinks traditionally consumed by people living in countries along the Mediterranean Sea.

The Mediterranean Diet emphasizes eating fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, and flavorful herbs and spices; fish and seafood at least a couple of times a week; and poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt in moderation, while saving sweets and red meat for special occasions.

Strong research suggests that the Mediterranean diet can possibly reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It can preserve your brain volume with age, in addition to helping ward off diseases like Alzheimer’s. The Mediterranean diet has also been shown to shrink waistlines and improve mental function.

Fiber in whole grains, legumes, fruit, nuts, vegetables, and nuts are all cornerstones of the Mediterranean diet. These all help slow digestion and helps control blood sugar levels.

The monounsaturated fats in olive oil, nuts, and fish can protect against heart disease and improve both glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. 

Plant foods are the foundation of the Mediterranean Diet. In this diet, you eat plenty of colorful fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains and cereals instead of refined grains and cereals.

This diet focuses heavily on the use of olive oil as it has been a staple in the Mediterranean Diet for over 2,500 years. It adds flavor and texture and is high in health-promoting monounsaturated fats and antioxidants and is the primary fat used. It is used in cooking, seasoning, dressings, and is always extra virgin olive oil, first press.

Through a hands-on cooking school, participants can learn more about the Mediterranean Diet, such as how to incorporate dishes of fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains into your meal planning as well as discuss the health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet.

You will prepare and taste recipes typical of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea in this hands-on workshop. We will learn about foods from both the Eastern and Western regions and what makes the Mediterranean Diet so healthy. Class dates are August 3rd & 17th, from 9:00 to 11:30 am, and costs $60.00 per person (covers both sessions). For reservations or for more information, call the Miller County Extension office 870-779-3609 or e-mail cdue@uaex.edu. Space is limited.

If you would like more information about the Mediterranean Diet, contact the Miller County Extension Office, 870-779-3609 or visit us in room 215 at the Miller County Courthouse. We're online at cdue@uaex.edu, on Facebook at UAEXMillerCountyFCS/CarlaDue, on Twitter @MillerCountyFCS or on the web at uaex.edu/Miller.

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office as soon as possible prior to the workshop.

Tuscan Salmon is from the Western region and features fresh salmon, and grapes for a colorful, flavorful dish that serves 6. At only 307 calories per serving it is a great addition to a healthy meal. Recipes like this and others will be featured in the cooking school.

Tuscan Salmon

1 teaspoon ground mustard

1 teaspoon dried thyme (crushed)

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

6 salmon steaks or fillets (4 oz each)

2 teaspoons honey

1 tablespoon olive oil, divided

8 cups spinach leaves

1/2 teaspoon minced garlic

2 cups red seedless grapes, cut in half

1/2 cup dry red wine

Salt, to taste

 

Combine salt, mustard, thyme and pepper: mix well. Rub both sides of salmon fillets with honey and sprinkle with seasoning mixture. Heat 2 teaspoons olive oil in nonstick skillet. Brown both sides of salmon fillets. Toss spinach and garlic with remaining 1 teaspoon oil in 13x9x2- inch baking dish. Place salmon on spinach, cover loosely with aluminum foil and bake at 300°F for 10 minutes. Sauté grapes in skillet used to brown salmon. Add wine, bring to boil, season to taste with remaining seasoning mixture and salt; reduce by half. Serve salmon on spinach; top with grape sauce. Makes 6 servings

By Carla Due
County Extension Agent - FCS
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Carla Due
County Extension Agent - FCS
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
400 Laurel Street, Suite 215 Texarkana AR 71854
(870) 779-3609
cdue@uaex.edu

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    The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office (or other appropriate office) as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

    The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.