UACES Facebook Don't Put Raw Eggs in Your Homemade Ice Cream

Don't Put Raw Eggs in Your Homemade Ice Cream

With the temporary closure of one of the favorite ice cream makers in our area, many are looking for alternatives this weekend and are dragging the ice cream freezers from the attic to make some homemade ice cream. There are a myriad of recipes that use raw eggs in the mixture. This is a food safety issue due to the risk of the food borne illness, Salmonella.

TEXARKANA, Ark. –

cooked custard with wooden spoon
COOKED CUSTARD -- Making your homemade ice cream with a simple cooked custard eliminates the risk of salmonella.

There is no clear information on when or how ice cream was created. Everyone seems to claim that they created it. One story is that in 1744, Colonists brought over recipes from Europe, or that in 1782 Martha Washington left a bowl of cream outside one night at Mt. Vernon and the next morning discovered ice cream. There actually is no one inventor of ice cream, but there are building blocks in history that have led from one idea to another that has eventually led us to the ice cream we enjoy today.

With the temporary closure of one of the favorite ice cream makers in our area, many are looking for alternatives this holiday weekend and are dragging the ice cream freezer from the attic, dusting it off and preparing to crank it up with some homemade ice cream.

There are a myriad of ice cream recipes out there and many use raw eggs in the mixture. This is a food safety issue due to the risk of the food borne illness Salmonella.  Salmonella isn’t a new illness. It was first discovered by an American scientist named Dr. Salmon over 125 years ago. Most people with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps within 12 and 72 hours after infection. It usually lasts 4 to 7 days and most individuals recover without treatment.

Although you may have prepared homemade ice cream before using raw eggs, you may have been one of the lucky ones. It is estimated by the CDC that 1.2 million illnesses and approximately 450 deaths occur due to non-typhodial Salmonella annually in the U.S. 

A quick tip for preventing Salmonella is not to eat or drink foods containing raw eggs.You can still enjoy homemade ice cream without the risk of Salmonella by making cooked custard as your base.

Thorough cooking is perhaps the most effective way to make sure that eggs are safe. Don’t let the term cooked custard scare you. It is really easy to do. The recipe below for Vanilla Ice Cream is made from cooked custard that is heated to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit, and then cooled. This temperature will kill Salmonella, if present.

Quality homemade ice cream starts with quality ingredients. The creaminess you will get depends upon the type of milk you use. Skim or low-fat milk will be similar to ice milk; whole milk, half and half, light cream or heavy whipping cream for any part of the milk and cream will produce a creamy, decadent, gourmet ice cream. The recipe provided below uses both whipping cream and whole milk, producing a rich, creamy ice cream sure to become a family favorite for those special occasions.

The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture in Miller County, offers information on summer food safety to help you keep your summer food activities safe. For your free copy of ice cream recipes and tips, click here or contact me at 870-779-3609, visit the Miller County courthouse, or follow me on social media, on facebook at UAEXMillerCountyFCS/CarlaHaleyHadley or twitter @MillerCountyFCS.

As you begin planning your Memorial Day weekend festivities, make sure you prepare a cooked custard base for your homemade ice cream. Here is my favorite vanilla ice cream recipe.

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream

4 eggs

2 and one half cups sugar

7 cups whole milk

3 cups whipping cream

2 and one half tablespoons vanilla

One half teaspoon salt

In large stockpot, beat eggs until light. Add sugar gradually, beating until thick.  Add 3 cups milk. Turn burner on to medium and heat until the mixture is thickened and registers 160 degrees F. on a thermometer. This is also the point that at which the mixture will coat a metal spoon. Stir constantly to prevent scorching. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Pour into 5-quart freezer can, adjust dasher and cover. Pack 6 parts crushed ice and 1 part rock salt around can. Chill the custard thoroughly before freezing. Once chilled, freeze according to directions for your freezer. Continue to add more ice and salt to maintain level. Yields 5 quarts.

By Carla Haley-Hadley
County Extension Agent - FCS
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Carla Haley-Hadley
County Extension Agent - FCS
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
400 Laurel Street, Suite 215 Texarkana AR 71854
(870) 779-3609
chaley@uaex.edu

 

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office (or other appropriate office) as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.