UACES Facebook October is 4-H Month - Learning, doing, growing

October is 4-H Month - Learning, doing, growing

October is a big month for Arkansas’ more than 120,000 4-H members. Not only is a national 4-H month, but also it’s the Arkansas 4-H Month of Service and encompasses 4-H National Youth Science Day on Oct. 5.

TEXARKANA, Ark. –

October is a big month for Arkansas’ more than 120,000 4-H members. Not only is a national 4-H month, but also it’s the Arkansas 4-H Month of Service and encompasses 4-H National Youth Science Day on Oct. 5.

“4-H is one of the nation’s best known youth development programs,” said Priscella Thomas-Scott, 4-H events coordinator for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. “Whether the 4-H member participates through a school program or an after-school club, the aim is the same: learning by doing.”

That learn-by-doing philosophy takes many forms, she said.

“4-H can help Arkansas’ young people become more engaged in science and technology, and learn life and workforce skills such as public speaking or welding,” Thomas-Scott said. “National studies have shown that 4-H members are more likely to enroll in college and be better positioned to be contributing citizens.”

In Arkansas, the Month of Service was implemented in 2014 as an opportunity for 4-H members to give back to their communities. Projects included cleanups of natural areas and collecting and donating goods for food pantries across Arkansas.

Drone Discovery

Each year’s Science Day project is geared toward getting youth to develop solutions to real world problems. This engineering challenge centers on unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Youth will learn everything from in-flight dynamics, aircraft types, flight safety and regulations, remote sensing and flight control.  

Youth will conduct the experiment at hundreds of local events taking place in all 50 states, and in countries around the world. National 4‑H Council will host the flagship national event, with hundreds of youth participating in the challenge on October 5 in Washington, D.C. The national sponsors of 2016 4‑H NYSD are HughesNet®, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Cellular.

“What’s so exciting about 4‑H NYSD is that it’s a hands-on, interactive learning experience that uses cutting-edge topics from the real world to get youth excited about science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM,” said Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO, National 4‑H Council. “For many kids, this experiential approach to learning ignites an interest in STEM topics that can quickly grow into a passion. Facilitating this progression—from interest to sustained passion—is what 4‑H STEM is all about.”

What 4-H can do

As a youth development program, 4-H is effective. Research done over a 10-year period found that 4-H members are:

  • Nearly four times more likely to make contributions to their community
  • Twice as likely to be active in the community
  • Twice as likely to make healthier choices
  • Girls who are 4-H members are two to three times more likely to take part in high school science programs

To learn more about 4-H contact your county extension office.

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture offers all its Extension and Research programs and services without regard to race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. 

By Samantha Kroll
County Extension Agent - 4-H
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division f Agriculture

Media Contact: Samantha Kroll
County Extension Agent - 4-H
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
400 Laurel Street, Suite 215 Texarkana AR 71854
(870) 779-3609
skroll@uaex.edu

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  • The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office (or other appropriate office) as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

    The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.