UACES Facebook Farmer of the Month - July 2015 - Brandon Wren

Farmer of the Month - July 2015 - Brandon Wren

When asked what he thought was most important for the public to know about the commodities he produces, he replied “that they know we raise a safe product and we actually care about our product and our land.” He is always “trying to improve our product and our land,” trying to leave it better than it was before.

TEXARKANA, Ark. –

For our July Miller County “Farmer of the Month”, we would like to recognize and show appreciation to Mr. Brandon Wren.

Brandon attended high school in Prescott, AR where he graduated in 1993. He then attended college at SAU. He grew up on a race horse farm and got into cattle during college, around 1994. Both sets of grandparents had cattle so he just naturally “took to it.” He says that he grew into the cattle business by “surrounding myself with good cattlemen.”

Stocker calves are his primary operation, running approximately 2000-3000 head per year. 220 head were just shipped out this past Tuesday. He typically sends cattle to Kansas or Nebraska using the best options available at the time, such as Superior Livestock or private treaty. Mr. Wrenalso owns and manages a cow –calf operation as well as 160 acres of pecans. In addition to farming, Brandon also currently serves as Board President for Miller County Farm Bureau.

Brandon has been married to Lisa for 15 years and they have 3 children, ages 12, 9, and 7. He says, Lisa and the children are an intricate part to assisting with the operation; from bringing up cattle to keeping books.

He says his favorite part of farming is the “independence and the freedom of working for yourself and being able to see the fruits of your labor.”

When asked what he thought was most important for the public to know about the commodities he produces, he replied “that they know we raise a safe product and we actually care about our product and our land.” He is always “trying to improve our product and our land,” trying to leave it better than it was before.

When asked how the flood has affected him, he said “this flood has cost me more money than any drought has.” The cattle are somewhat underweight. He estimates they were about 100-150 pounds light because he had to ship them early or put extra input in them to get the weight up, which cost more money. Forages have also been limited. “Land has been underwater and the grass ruined. April and May is prime season for grass growing and this year it was under water.”

By Jennifer Caraway
County Extension Agent - Agriculture
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Jennifer Caraway
County Extension Agent - Agriculture
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
400 Laurel Street, Suite 215 Texarkana AR 71854
(870) 779-3609
jcaraway@uaex.edu

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