UACES Facebook Miller County Farmer of the Month - September 2015

Miller County Farmer of the Month - September 2015

Shane’s favorite part of farming is “seeing the fruits of my labor.” He works hard at improving the genetics on his herd and likes seeing that come to fruition with a fall calving season. When asked what he thinks is the most important thing he would like you to know about the commodities he produces, he said, “With consumers becoming more aware of where and how their food is grown, I have worked hard at genetically improving my herd naturally through breeding and producing a more natural raised marketable beef cow utilizing less antibiotics and hormones.”

TEXARKANA, Ark. –

Each month we honor the men and women who make Arkansas agriculture strong. Agriculture is the life-blood of Arkansas, and farmers are the backbone of agriculture. The farmer/rancher we would like to honor and show gratitude to for his diligence and hard work for September is Shane Cutchall.

Shane is no stranger to agriculture and has always been active in 4-H and FFA. He won Arkansas State 4-H O’Rama livestock judging at Fayetteville in 1994. He was also active showing Limousine and Simmental Cattle.

A 1996 graduate from Fouke High School, he also attended college classes at Texarkana College. He left the farm directly after high school to try several other occupations but being raised on a farm, when he had the opportunity to return to farming, he did. He attributes his start in part to his grandfather who helped persuade him to get back into farming.

In addition to his cattle operation, he has also worked for Stockman’s Supply for the past 6 years. He enjoys the ability to help other producers improve their herds with the products he sells.

He is a third generation farmer and has been farming now for 12 years. He has approximately 150 head of commercial beef cows on approximately 480 acres. Mr. Cutchall is a strong advocate of incorporating quality bulls into his breeding program and currently utilizes the SemAngus (Simmental + Angus), saying that it is the best, most vigorous hybrid for his herd.

Shane’s favorite part of farming is “seeing the fruits of my labor.” He works hard at improving the genetics on his herd and likes seeing that come to fruition with a fall calving season. When asked what he thinks is the most important thing he would like you to know about the commodities he produces, he said, “With consumers becoming more aware of where and how their food is grown, I have worked hard at genetically improving my herd naturally through breeding and producing a more natural raised marketable beef cow utilizing less antibiotics and hormones.”

When asked how the recent flood affected him, he said that he had 90 acres under water for approximately 10 days when the flood hit and he lost 12 acres to the river during the flood. Fortunately, he did not lose any of his herd.

American farmers/ranchers like Mr. Cutchall are committed to honesty, integrity and hard work and we express our gratitude to them for their dedication to making their product the best it can be. Be sure to thank a farmer for the necessities they provide to us on a daily basis.

Fun Facts: The beef industry in Arkansas contributes significantly to the state's economy and in 2012 was ranked the 5th largest agriculture commodity in the state.

Cattle are ruminants. This means they have one stomach with four separate compartments. Their digestive system allows them to digest plant material by repeatedly regurgitating it and chewing it again as cud. This digestive process allows cattle to thrive on grasses, other vegetation, and feed. A cow chews its cud for about eight hours a day. When an animal chews its cud it is a sign of health and contentment. Other ruminant animals include deer, elk, sheep, and goats.

By Jennifer Caraway
County Extension Agent - Agriculture
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Jennifer Caraway
County Extension Agent - Agriculture
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
400 Laurel Street, Suite 215 Texarkana AR 71854
(870) 779-3609
jcaraway@uaex.edu

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