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Did You Know?

Cattle are not the major cause of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.

Hot Springs, Ark. – Cattle are not the major cause of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.  In fact, their contribution to greenhouse gases is much less than most people think.  According to numbers from the Environmental Protection Agency, cattle production is not a top contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. 

  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency in 2011:
    • Agriculture = 6.9% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Livestock = 3.1% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Methane from livestock = 2.8% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Methane from beef cattle = 1.5% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
  • To compare with other industries:
    • Electricity Generation = 33% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Transportation = 26% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Industrial Use = 11% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Residential and Commercial Use = 8% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. 

Did you know that we owe a debt of gratitude to cows for our health? The word “vaccine” is derived from the Latin word “vaccinus” which means “from cows”.  The term "vaccination” was first coined in 1803 by British physician Edward Jenner for the technique he devised of preventing smallpox by injecting people with the cowpox virus. At that time, smallpox was one of the deadliest diseases known to humans where approximately 30% of cases ended in death, typically in the second week of infection. Dr. Jenner came to the idea of vaccination after observing that milkmaids who had previously caught cowpox did not later catch smallpox. Cowpox is a mild illness in cattle that can be spread from a cow to humans via sores on the cows’ udders. Thanks to Dr. Jenner’s keen insight, humans and animals today are protected from horrible diseases due to timely vaccinations. 

Did you know antibiotics are medications that fight bacterial infections? They are used in cattle to prevent, control and treat disease. These drugs are very important to ensuring animal health and experts agree their use has contributed to improved food safety over the years.

  • Farmers and ranchers recognize antibiotics must be used carefully in order to preserve their future effectiveness for our families and our animals.
  • Farmers and ranchers avoid using antibiotics that are important to human medicine and have invested in research and education programs designed to help us continuously improve how we use antibiotics.
  • Farmers and ranchers have no reason to overuse antibiotics but rather every reason to use them as selectively as possible. For one, it’s the law, but antibiotics also are a costly input for the small business men and women who raise cattle for beef. 

For more information, contact the Garland County Extension Office at 623-6841 or 922-4703, or email Jimmy Driggers at jdriggers@uaex.edu

EHC Information

Are you interested in joining an existing Extension Homemakers Club? EHC is the largest volunteer organization in the state. For information on EHC call 623-6841 or 922-4703 or email jvincent@uaex.edu.

Master Gardeners

If you’re interested in becoming a Master Gardener and would like more information, you’re welcome to attend their monthly meeting on the 3rd Thursday of each month at 1pm at the Elks Lodge.  You may also call the Extension office on 623-6841 or 922-4703 or email abates@uaex.edu.

4-H Information

We have several 4-H clubs for our Garland county youth who are 5 to 19 years old.  For more information on all the fun 4-H activities there are, call the Extension Office at 623-6841 or 922-4703 or email Linda Bates at lbates@uaex.edu

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution.

By Jimmy Driggers
County Extension Agent - Staff Chair
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Jimmy Driggers
County Extension Agent - Staff Chair
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
236 Woodbine Hot Springs AR 71901
(501) 623-6841
jdriggers@uaex.edu

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office (or other appropriate office) as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

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