UACES Facebook Basic Knowledge to Assist New Cattle Producers

Basic Knowledge to Assist New Cattle Producers

When I started at the Extension Service in the early 1990s, agriculture was still dominated by traditional producers engaged primarily in forage-based beef production.

Hot Springs, Ark. – When I started at the Extension Service in the early 1990s, agriculture was still dominated by traditional producers engaged primarily in forage-based beef production. Most operations were fairly large and run by experienced full-time farmers and ranchers. Over the last two decades, the number of these producers has declined.   We’ve seen a tremendous increase in small, often novice landowners. What hasn’t changed in 20-plus years is the fact that most producers seek our consultation services after they’ve been in business long enough for issues to arise that range from minor to critical.

     Rarely do we get an initial request for consultation before someone has chosen and invested in an enterprise and has begun operation. When we can get in on the ground floor with a new producer, there are some basic concepts that we make sure are grasped immediately, and management of a livestock enterprise is at least third down on the hierarchy. First are the soils and forages on the property and realistic expectations of the amount of dry matter that can be grown. That number determines stocking rate, which must be appropriate for anything else to work. Once an appropriate stocking rate is determined, there are five basics I believe should be in place before a livestock enterprise is undertaken.

     1. Ensure that you have a sound perimeter fence that will contain the class and species you will run. Be aware that small ruminants have different fencing requirements than beef cattle.

     2. Have a corral and a means to restrain the animals. It certainly does not have to be elaborate, but it does need to be functional. This is needed to be able to receive and ship, implement health protocols, and address other health-related issues that will arise from time to time.

     3. Develop a good relationship with a veterinarian, including a mutually agreed upon comprehensive health protocol for all classes you will be managing.

     4. Have a sound understanding of the factors that affect the nutritional requirements of all classes of livestock – factors like age, sex, weight, stage of reproduction, level of milk production, body condition score, desired rate of gain, weather, etc. It is an eye opener to many new producers to learn that a lactating cow needs twice as much protein and at least 50 percent more energy than when she was not nursing a calf.

    5. Be aware that adequate nutrition and health is paramount to reproductive performance. Reproductive performance is a direct indication of appropriate stocking rate, effective health and nutrition programs, and management in general. Reproductive performance drives the amount of product you eventually sell, which will determine income and personal satisfaction.

     As livestock producers, it is our responsibility to contain our animals, be able to address problems as they arise, to know diseases and parasites that can harm them, to provide protection from those diseases and parasites, to know the nutrient requirements of livestock at all stages of production, and ensure they are receiving adequate nutrition. Success depends on understanding that soil and forage management, health, nutrition, reproduction, and marketing are interconnected and interdependent. It is our job as livestock producers to use this understanding to care for our livestock.

     The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution.

4-H Information

There are several 4-H clubs for our Garland county youth who are 5 to 19 years old.  For more information on all the fun 4-H activities that are available for our youth, call Linda Bates at the Extension Office on 623-6841 or 922-4703 or email her at  lbates@uaex.edu.

Master Gardener Information

Master Gardener meetings are held on the 3rd Thursday of each month at the Elks Lodge.  They’re open to the public and guests are welcome. For more information call the Extension Office at 623-6841 or 922-4703 or email Allen Bates at abates@uaex.edu

EHC Information

Are you interested in joining an existing Extension Homemakers Club? EHC is the largest volunteer organization in the state. For information on EHC contact Jessica Vincent on 623-684 or 922-4703 or email her at jvincent@uaex.edu.

 

By Jimmy Driggers
County Extension Agent - Staff Chair
The Cooperative Extension Service
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Jimmy Driggers
County Extension Agent - Staff Chair
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
236 Woodbine Hot Springs AR 71901
(501) 623-6841
jdriggers@uaex.edu

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  • The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact your County Extension office (or other appropriate office) as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

    The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.