UACES Facebook Landscape Trees By Scientific Name A-C

Landscape Trees By Scientific Name A-C

Printer Friendly Version - All Landscape Trees by Scientific Name

Scientific Name Common Name Comments 
Acer palmatum var. atropurpureum
Thumbnail picture of Redleaf Japonese Maple. Select for larger images.  
Redleaf Japanese Maple
  
  • Size: typically small tree (8' to 15')
  • Flowers & fruits: not significant
  • Fall color: depending on cultivar, can be colorful
  • Culture: avoid windy sites: requires moist soil especially in summer. Typically not well suited to full sun in Arkansas
  • Uses: specimen in landscapes
  • Cultivars: variety atropurpureum is a large group of red foliage forms. Cultivars include: 'Bloodgood', 'Trompenberg'
Acer palmatum var. dissectum
Thumbnail picture of Cutleaf Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum var. dissectum) with red leaf color  Select for larger images and information.  
Cutleaf Japanese Maple
  
  • Culture: avoid windy sites: requires moist soil especially in summer. Typically not well suited to full sun in Arkansas
  • Uses: specimen in landscapes
  • Cultivars: variety dissectum is a large group of cutleaf forms; Cultivars include: 'Tamukeyama', 'Garnet', 'Crimson Queen', ‘Burgundy Lace’
Acer platanoides
Thumbnail picture of Norway Maple (Acer platanoides) tree.  Select for larger images and information.  
Norway Maple
  
  • Size: medium sized shade tree (60'); fast growing
  • Flowers & fruits: not significant
  • Fall color: none
  • Culture: tolerant of soil type. Best in full sun.
  • Use: street tree, lawn shade tree
  • Cultivars include: 'Crimson King', 'Columnare', 'Globosum', 'Schwedleri'
  • More common in Northwest Arkansas
Acer rubrum
Thumbnail picture of Red Maple (Acer rubrum) tree in red fall color  Select for larger images and information. 
Red Maple
 
  • Size: medium sized shade tree (60'); fast growing
  • Flowers & fruits: although small, add distinctive red color to landscape in early spring
  • Fall color: variable (reason for cultivars) but excellent; typically red
  • Culture: tolerant of soil type. Fast growing
  • Uses: street tree, lawn shade tree
  • Cultivars include: 'October Glory', 'Red Sunset', 'Autumn Flame'
  • Native from Florida to Canada in riverbottoms
Acer saccharinum *
Thumbnail picture of Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) tree in yellowish fall color  Select for larger images and information. 
Silver Maple *
 
  • Size: large sized shade tree (80'); very fast growing
  • Flowers & fruits: not significant
  • Fall color: fair, yellowish
  • Culture: tolerant of site conditions
  • Use: typically not recommended for landscapes (brittle, weak wooded)
Acer saccharum
Thumbnail picture of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) tree in bright orange fall color  Select for larger images and information. 
Sugar Maple
 
  • Size: medium to large sized shade tree (65' tall by 55' wide)
  • Flowers & fruits: not significant
  • Fall color: exceptional orange/red fall color
  • Culture: best in moist, rich soil. Intolerant of heat and dry sites. Typically best suited in Northwest Arkansas
  • Use: shade tree in Northwest Arkansas
  • Cultivars: ‘Legacy’, ‘John Pair’
Aesculus pavia
Thumbnail picture of Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia).  Select for larger images and information.  
Red Buckeye
  
  • Size: large shrub or small tree (12' tall by 12' wide)
  • Flowers & fruits: showy terminal red flowers in April. Buckeye fruit
  • Fall color: none
  • Culture: partial shade. Rich, moist soils
  • Use: understory plant, good for woodland gardens
  • Native to Arkansas woodlands
Albizia julibrissin *
Thumbnail picture of Mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin) with summer pink flowers  Select for larger images and information.  
Mimosa;
Silk Tree *
  
  • Size: small flowering tree (20' tall); fast growing
  • Flowers: very attractive, light to deep pink all summer. Flower brush-like
  • Fruit: 6-8” long pod
  • Fall color: none
  • Culture: full sun. Tolerant of site conditions
  • Use: typically not recommended for landscapes (brittle; short-lived; weedy)
Amelanchier canadensis
Thumbnail picture of Shadblow (Amelanchier canadensis) tree in white spring fowers.  Select for larger images and information.  
Shadblow; Serviceberry; Juneberry
  
  • Size: large multi-stemmed shrub or small, upright tree (15' to 20' tall)
  • Flowers: early spring, white
  • Fruit: June, red-purple, edible
  • Fall color: maroon
  • Culture: partial shade to shade. Requires rich, moist soil
  • Use: understory or woodland plant
Betula nigra
Thumbnail picture of River Birch (Betula nigra) tree in yellowish fall color  Select for larger images and information. 
River Birch
 
  • Size: small sized tree (35' tall by 25' wide)
  • Flowers & fruit: not significant
  • Fall color: yellowish
  • Beautiful exfoliating bark
  • Culture: very adaptable
  • Disease/insect: none significant. Avoid alkaline soils (iron chlorosis)
  • Use: small landscape tree typically selected for attractive bark
  • Cultivars: Heritage™ (salmon white bark), Dura-Heat™
  • Misc: lowland species, native to Arkansas
Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiata'
Thumbnail picture of Fastigiate European Hornbeam trees (Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiata') in yellowish fall color  Select for larger images and information. 
European Hornbeam; Fastigiate
 
  • Size: small sized tree (20' tall by 8' wide)
  • Flowers & fruit: not significant
  • Fall color: yellowish, like a hickory
  • Culture: adaptable
  • Disease/insect: none significant
  • Use: good urban tree
Carya illinoinensis
Thumbnail picture of Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) tree.  Select for larger images and information. 
Pecan
 
  • Size: medium to large sized tree (65' tall by 75' wide). Often a symmetrical, cascading vase shape
  • Flowers: not significant and messy
  • Fruits: edible pecan. Takes 8 to 12 years before they fruit
  • Fall color: fair. Sometimes a deep yellow
  • Culture: fairly adaptable
  • Insect/disease: fall webworm
  • Use: not typically used in highly maintained landscapes
Catalpa speciosa
Thumbnail picture of Northern Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa) tree.  Select for larger images and information. 
Northern Catalpa
 
  • Size: medium sized tree (45' tall by 30' wide)
  • Flowers: beautiful white flowers in May
  • Fruit: cigar shaped pod. Messy
  • Fall color: none. Leaves distinctive heart shaped leaves
  • Culture: adaptable
  • Use: rarely used in well maintained landscapes since weak wooded, messy leaves and fruits
  • Actually one of two species in the state. The other is C. bignonioides (Southern Catalpa) which flowers 2-3 weeks later.
Cedrus deodara
Thumbnail picture of Deodara Cedar (Cedrus deodara) tree.  Select for larger images and more information.  
Deodar Cedar
  
  • Size: needle evergreen (55' tall by 50' wide)
  • Flowers: not significant
  • Fruit: beautiful cone
  • Culture: full sun. Best in rich, moist soil. Provide adequate water. Less cold hardy than C. atlantica
  • Use: specimen
Celtis laevigata
Thumbnail picture of Southern Hackberry (Celtis laevigata) tree.  Select for larger images and information. 
Southern Hackberry; Sugar Hackberry
 
  • Size: medium sized tree (50' tall by 50' wide)
  • Flowers: not significant
  • Fruit: small 'berry', birds love
  • Fall color: not significant
  • Bark: distinctive gray, warty branches
  • Culture: very adaptable
  • Disease/insect: Asian woolly hackberry aphid
  • Use: native; rarely planted in landscapes. Weak wooded
Cercis canadensis
Thumbnail picture of Eastern Redbud tree (Cercis canadensis) in pink spring flowers  Select for larger images and information.  
Eastern Redbud
  
  • Size: small sized tree (18' tall by 18' wide)
  • Flowers: very attractive pink-purple (white form 'Alba' also available but not as common) flowers early spring
  • Fruit: small pod
  • Fall color: none
  • Culture: best in partial shade; best with constant moisture
  • Disease/insect: none significant. Occasional canker
  • Use: specimen small flowering tree; woodland
  • Cultivars ‘Oklahoma’ (texensis) more drought tolerant, ‘Alba’ (white flowered form), 'Forest Pansy' (purple leaves)
Chionanthus virginicus
Thumbnail picture of Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) tree with white spring flowers  Select for larger images and information.  
Fringetree: Grancy Gray-beard
  
  • Size: large shrub/small-sized tree (20' tall by 20' wide)
  • Flowers: dramatic lacy white flowers mid-April
  • Fruit: not significant. Dark blue drupe
  • Fall color: none
  • Culture: adaptable. Even flowers well in shade
  • Disease/insect: none
  • Uses: woodland landscape
  • Native
Cornus florida
Thumbnail picture of Eastern Dogwood tree (Cornus florida) in white spring flowers  Select for larger images and information.  
Eastern Flowering Dogwood
  
  • Size: small sized tree (15' tall by 20' wide)
  • Flowers: exceptional flower (bracts) display in early spring
  • Fruits: noticeable red fruits in spring
  • Fall color: attractive maroon
  • Culture: best in partial shade and adequate moisture during Arkansas summer months
  • Disease/insect: leaf spots
  • Uses: small flowering tree, woodland
  • Cultivars: many for larger bracts and bract color (pink)
Cornus kousa
Thumbnail picture of Kousa Dogwood tree (Cornus kousa) in white spring flowers  Select for larger images and information. 
Kousa Dogwood
 
  • Size: small sized tree (18' tall by 22' wide)
  • Flowers: 3 to 4 weeks after C. florida. Bract is pointed in contrast to C. florida (notched)
  • Fruit: red, looks like a strawberry
  • Fall color: nice orange /red fall color
  • Culture: slightly more tolerant of heat than C. florida
  • Disease/insect: none serious
  • Uses: small flowering tree
Crataegus phaenopyrum
Thumbnail picture of Washington Hawthorn (Crataegus phaenopyrum) tree in red fall color  Select for larger images and more information.  
Washington Hawthorn
  
  • Size: small sized tree (20' tall by 12' wide)
  • Flowers: attractive white flowers April
  • Fruit: showy red fruits in fall and winter
  • Fall color: maroon fall color
  • Culture: full sun. Adaptable to soils
  • Disease/insect: cedar apple rust (Less susceptible to rust than other hawthorns, but still a concern)
  • Uses: specimen
  • More common in Northwest Arkansas