Website Contact

M. Elena Garcia
Professor - Horticulture
Extension Fruit & Nut Specialist

Phone: 479-575-2790
Fax: 479-575 8619
Email: megarcia@uark.edu

Office:
University of Arkansas
Dept. of Horticulture
310 Plant Sciences Building
Fayetteville, AR  72701
Related Links
County Offices

Home Garden Fruits & Nuts in Arkansas

Blackberry, Grapes, Apples, Peaches, Strawberries, Blueberries collageGrowing fruits and nuts in the home garden can be very rewarding since one gets to eat “the fruits of their labor.”  However, fruits and nuts require a very high level of management, particularly in pest management.

Considerable attention should be paid to selecting and preparing the planting site, choosing cultivars with local adaptation and pest resistance, and following pest and cultural management practices

The University of Arkansas has a rich heritage in fruit breeding. The effort was begun by Dr. James N. Moore, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in 1964. This effort continues under the direction of Dr. John R. Clark, University Professor of Horticulture with the Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.

The University of Arkansas' fruit breeding program has an emphasis on adaptability to Arkansas' climate.  The program is based at the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station's Fruit Research Station in Clarksville, with testing of developments at the Southwest Research and Extension Center in Hope and the Arkansas Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Fayetteville.  Results from the fruit breeding and fruit variety testing programs are used to develop lists of recommended fruit varieties for commercial fruit growers and homeowners in Arkansas.

Licensed Propagators:  University of Arkansas Patented Cultivars

Blackberry Propagators

Blueberry Propagators

Grape Propagators

Nectarine & Free-Market Peach Propagators

Additional Information

Cultivar or Variety?
Variety and cultivar are two terms often abused by gardeners and horticulturists.  What's the difference, you ask?  Quite a lot.