UACES Facebook Western dressage added to Arkansas 4-H State Horse Show

Western dressage added to Arkansas 4-H State Horse Show

July 3, 2014

Fast Facts:

  • Arkansas 4-H State Horse Show set for July 14-17 at the White County Fairgrounds, 802 Davis Dr. in Searcy
  • Only 4-H competitors who qualify may compete
  • Contests include barrel racing, pole bending, horse bowl, public speaking, and ranch roping clinic
  • Anyone can be a spectator; event is free

(380 words)

SEARCY, Ark. -- The 2014 Arkansas 4-H State Horse Show, already home to a wide variety of English and Western riding styles and horse-related activities, will feature a new riding discipline, western dressage, during its July 14-17 run at the White County Fairgrounds. 

Each year, the state horse show program brings together 175 qualified teenagers and their horses to show their knowledge about horses, public speaking skills, ability to take care of their horse, and their riding performance. The fairgrounds are located at 802 Davis Drive in Searcy.

 “This is an event to show their horse and what they have been working on,” said Mark Russell, an assistant professor-equine for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture.

New to the prize list is western dressage, a relatively new discipline that combines classical dressage and the traditions of western riding. “Dressage” translates roughly to “preparation” or “Training,” and both the English and western versions of this sport aim to train horse and rider as a team working in balance, physically and mentally.  

In preparation for the contest, these teenagers have been working all year and some of them took part in two riding camps to hone their skills, he said.

The State Horse Show is by the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service and only youths enrolled in the 4-H Horse program may compete.

The goat-tying contest will kick off the event on Monday, July 14 at 8 a.m. Then followed by barrel racing, pole bending, stake race, and keyhole race. Towards sunset, contestants will join Horse Bowl and public speaking competition to test their confidence, poise, and equine knowledge.

The second day will include education contest, dressage competition, interviews, and Horsemanship Clinic.

Various performance contests will take place on the third day, such as hunter under saddle competition, western riding, and ranch roping Clinic.

The event will end with ranch reining and ranch halter on Thursday.

“My goal is that each kid can learn something and that they’ll feel that they have given it a hundred percent and they’ll tell their friends about it,” Russell said.

The event is free and open to the public. The event runs from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. from Monday through Thursday, July 14-17.

To learn more about Extension Horse Programs, visit http://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/animals-forages/horses/.  

The Cooperative Extension Service is part of the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture and offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, national, origin, religion, gender, age, disability, marital or veteran status, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

All meetings and activities announced in this news release are open to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, marital or veteran status, or any other legally protected status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (large print, audiotapes, etc.) should notify the county Extension office as soon as possible prior to the activity. 

By Kezia Nanda
For the Cooperative Extension Service
UA System Division of Agriculture

Media Contact: Mary Hightower
Dir. of Communication Services
U of A Division of Agriculture
Cooperative Extension Service
(501) 671-2126
mhightower@uaex.edu

Related Links

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