UACES Facebook The Nutrition of Edamame - February 2012

The Nutrition of Edamame - February 2012

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video  Script:

[Video shows various pictures of soybean fields with specialists or agents in fields. Music plays in the background]

[Title Slide – The Nutrition of Edamame. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast. Presented by University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.]

Hi, I’m Rosemary Rodibaugh, Nutrition Professor  with the University of Arkansas Systems Division of Agriculture. [Rosemary Rodibaugh, PhD, RD, LD, Professor Nutrition University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture.

Many health experts consider edamame a super vegetable. Not only does it contain the vitamins, minerals and fiber that other vegetables do, but it’s also a great source of protein, making it comparable to meat.  [Video shows a producer with a hand full of harvested edamame pods. Slide shows a picture of edamame beans. Benefits of edamame: low calories; high in fiber; containing vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, folate, thiamin, potassium, and many other minerals.]

Edamame has a sweet, nutty flavor and a crisp texture. The beans are harvested when they are green when the flavor is at its best.  Edamame is low in calories, high in fiber, with just a trace of healthy fats.  There are different ways to prepare edamame, but it must be cooked before eating.  [Picture of edamame beans and chopped vegetables.]

To prepare the beans, boil them for 5 to 10 minutes in the pods, then remove them from the shell before serving. The beans can also be blanched and frozen or dried for later use.  [Video shows a person placing a pan of water on a stove and turning on the burner. Add a bit of salt to the water for taste. Add the edamame pods to the pan of boiling water. Stir. Boil for 5-10 minutes. Remove pot from the stove.]

Eat edamame like you would other beans in your diet, as an appetizer, snack, in soups, stews or salads and dips.  [Picture of warm, slightly salted, edamame pods in a bowl. Use fingers to pinch the beans from the pods. Do not eat the pods. Picture of edamame beans in soup, picture of edamame salsa, and a picture of edamame avocado spread with chips.]

[Rosemary Rodibaugh] Edamame is grown in Arkansas, so it fits right in to a locavore’s diet. Look for edamame in the produce or frozen food section of your local grocery store.

[Narrator with music playing in the background] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, and was funded impart by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.  For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county extension office.

[Title slide – Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast. Video shows various pictures of soybean fields with specialists or agents in fields. U of A Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your county extension office or go to www.uaex.edu. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast.]

 

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