UACES Facebook Arkansas Soybean Rust Monitoring Program - August 5, 2009

Arkansas Soybean Rust Monitoring Program - August 5, 2009

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video   Script: 

Scott Monfort - Extension Plant Pathologist
Amy Carroll - Program Associate

[Title Slide - Arkansas Soybean Rust Monitoring Program, Scott Monfort - Extension Plant Pathologist, Amy Carroll - Program Associate, Number 9 - August 5, 2009, Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

[Scott and Amy standing in a soybean field] I'm Scott Monfort, extension plant pathologist for the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and, I'm Amy Carroll, program associate. Today, we're going to talk to you a little bit about the soybean rust monitoring program.

[Slide - Arkansas Soybean Rust Monitoring Program, Funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board; Outline of the state of Arkansas with a soybean in the middle] The Arkansas Soybean Rust Monitoring Program is a statewide effort funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.

[Slide - Map of the state of Arkansas with county outlines showing the 2009 Sentinel Plot Locations; Plots monitored weekly when plants are in bloom and reproductive stages.] During the blooming and reproductive growth stages, when plants are most susceptible to rust infection, weekly monitoring of soybean sentinel plots occur. [Pictures of a lab technician examining samples through a microscope] These samples are inspected in the lab along with samples submitted from growers, county agents and state staff.

[Amy standing in a soybean field] When scouting for Asian soybean rust, there's a few things you should look for in your soybean crop.

[Picture of a soybean field near a tree line] First of all, select an area within your field near a tree line. [Video showing soybean field] Select a field with canopy closure. [Amy in a soybean field showing a blooming plant] Also, select a field that is blooming, which is the R1 to R6 growth stage. Next, whenever you're sending in your samples, only send in the apex leaves from the lower portion of the canopy.

[Picture of collected sample bag] After a sample has been collected, label the sample bag as completely as possible. [Picture of collected sample bag with leaves - collection date, GPS coordinates - County Name] Be sure to include the collection date, GPS coordinates, and county name. [Picture of collected sample bag with leaves and a damp paper towel placed inside] Put the 100 leaves collected, along with a damp paper towel, into the labeled bag and ship it immediately to the Lonoke Clinic. [Slide - Ship Samples To: Lonoke Extension & Research Center; Attn: Soybean Rust Samples; 2001 Highway 70 East; Lonoke, AR 72086]

[Amy sitting in the lab next to a microscope] When samples arrive here at the Lonoke Clinic, there's a detailed process that occurs in order to diagnose each sample.

[Picture of collected sample bag] The first thing that we do … we take the information that you put on the bag and we record it onto a piece of paper that we can keep for our records. [Amy inspects leaves individually] Next, we inspect each individual leaf on the backside of them … we look for anything that's raised and then, we look closer at that under a microscope. [Amy puts leaves under a microscope] When we look under the microscope, we look for the actual spores sporulating out of the pustules.

[Picture of soybean leaves with brown spots] Soybean rust pustules cannot be seen with the naked eye, however, suspicious leaves will have small brownish spots, almost like freckles, on the leaf surface and raised spores can be felt on the underside of the leaf. [Picture of soybean leaves being inspected with a hand lens] Using a 10X hand lens, spores, generally grouped in clusters, can be seen. [Picture of a soybean leaf magnified under a microscope showing spores] Sporulation from the pustules can be identified using a microscope at 40X magnification and confirms a diagnosis of soybean rust.

[Slide - Soybean Alerts; Sent by email and text message to: County Agents, Growers, Consultants, State Staff] If soybean rust is confirmed, county agents, growers, consultants, and state staff are notified immediately by email and text message alerts.

[Slide - When Soybean Rust is Confirmed - Reported to the PIPE National Database and Track Soybean Rust, nationwide at: http://www.sbrusa.net/cgi-bin/sbr/public.cgi] It is also reported to the PIPE National Database which logs all soybean rust found nationally. PIPE is also linked to a public Web site that tracks soybean rust nationwide.

If you have questions about soybean rust or the statewide monitoring program, contact a member of the Arkansas Soybean Rust Working Group.

[Slide - Soybean Rust Working Group contact information - In Lonoke, AR, Scott Monfort, Extension Plant Pathologist - 870-659-0648, Amy Carroll, Program Associate - 501-258-2509, Michael Emerson, Program Associate - 501-258-6492, Sherrie Smith, Plant Health Clinic Diagnostician - 501-676-3124; In

Monticello, AR, Cliff Coker, Extension Plant Pathologist - 870-723-5519, Amanda Greer, Program Associate - 870-460-5563; In Little Rock, AR Jeremy Ross, Extension Soybean Agronomist - 501-944-0621; In Fayetteville, AR - John Rupe, Professor of Plant Pathology - 479-601-2480; In Hope, AR, Kim Hurst, Program Associate - 870-777-9702]

Announcer

[Narrator] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and was funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county Extension Office. [Title slide - For more information contact your local county Extension office. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

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