UACES Facebook Horseweed: A Major Problem in Soybean Following Wheat - July 15, 2009

Horseweed: A Major Problem in Soybean Following Wheat - July 15, 2009

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Audio/Video    Script: 

Dr. Ken Smith
Weed Scientist

[Title Slide – Horseweed: A Major Problem in Soybean Following Wheat, Dr. Ken Smith, Weed Scientist , Number 7 - July 15, 2009, Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

[Ken Smith standing in a soybean field] We’re here today in Phillips County looking at some horseweed in wheat that’s been harvested, and in our earlier podcast we talked about the different treatments that we were initiating. We do have a [Video showing a burning field] burned field or a burned segment of this field, [Picture of a field with stubble] a stubble field that you’re seeing here, [Picture of a field that has been tilled] and a completely tilled field.

[Ken Smith] Looking at the horseweed and treatments that we can impose upon horseweed following wheat planting soybean. And in this field we planted Roundup® Ready Soybeans in half of it and in the other half of each treatment we planted Liberty Link soybeans. And we’ll impose our treatments on top of this. And if we can see here as we come in close [Pictures of small beans emerging] we can see that our beans have been planted, we’ve got our small beans coming up here following a rain that we got last week. [Ken Smith showing horseweed in the field] We can also see that our horseweed, much of it still green in these stems and if we've got green in this stem no doubt this weed will come back and [Picture of a field full of horseweed] give us a problem before the end of the year.

[Ken Smith showing horseweed in the field] Now certainly in all of these treatments we’ve got some that the combine took down and these are probably dead enough, they probably will not survive but a certain percentage of these will and these are our treatments that we will impose upon it.

[Picture of a stubble field.] Well here in Phillips county with our burn treatment, [Ken Smith showing a stubble field] just wanted to make a quick comparison between this horseweed that I pulled from the stubble only and we can see a lot of green material in this [Ken Smith using a pocket knife to shave down horseweed that is in a stubble field showing that it has a lot of green material], obviously very much alive, still coming back for trouble in our soybean whereas, if we come into the burned area, these look much browner. [Picture of horseweed left in a burned field] All of these are much darker, much less green, [Ken Smith using a pocket knife to shave down horseweed that is in a burned field showing that it has live green material] but yet when we cut into them we can still see that we've got some live material right down at the base of this and [Picture of horseweed in a field] we may still see some of this come back and give us a problem in our soybean.

[Ken Smith standing in a tilled field showing horseweed that has been completely tilled] Just an example of our fully tilled, the old fashioned way of controlling weeds, going in and doing a complete soil tillage or complete seed bed preparation. And as you can see as we move into this we do have a complete tillage, our horseweed, certainly been taken out, won’t be back to give us a problem with complete tillage. This has been disked twice, and then come back with our planter and as you can see we did plant into some moisture, [Video showing small soybean plants] our little soybeans are coming up, we are anticipating a good stand here, often times that’s not the case when we come in and do tillage following wheat harvest, we lose our moisture and we don’t get as a good a stand as we appear to be getting here today.

Announcer

[Narrator] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and was funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county Extension Office. [Title slide - For more information contact your local county Extension office. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

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