UACES Facebook Conventional soybeans will always have a niche - May 18, 2010

Conventional soybeans will always have a niche - May 18, 2010


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[Title Slide – Conventional Soybean. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. Number 32 - May 18, 2010]

[Narrator] [Pictures of a soybean fields] While genetically modified soybeans gain ground, specialists with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture say there will always be a place for conventional beans.

[Picture of Dr. Pengyin Chen in a greenhouse with soybean plants] Soybean Breeder Pengyin Chen and agronomist Jeremy Ross say there are a few factors that may contribute to a higher demand for conventional soybeans.

[Video of a tractor in a soybean field - slide Soybean Cost, 2010 - $241 per acre, 2009 - $235 per acre] First, is cost. The Division of Agriculture is projecting the cost-per-acre to grow soybeans in 2010 to be 241 dollars an acre, a six-dollar-per-acre increase over last year. [Picture of Dr. Pengyin Chen in a seed storage area] Chen says growers can save money compared to transgenic varieties by buying seed from varieties developed publicly by universities.

[Picture of a soybean field with pods - slide Conventional Soybean - right to save seed, buy new seed after two crops, $1 premium] Another cost saver is the right to save seed from conventional varieties developed in public breeding programs. Chen recommends buying new seed after two crops to avoid loss of vigor or genetic contamination. A third incentive for planting conventional soybeans is a premium of up to a dollar per bushel paid by some buyers who produce non-transgenic soy products.

[Picture of a researcher in a soybean field] In the meantime, Division of Agriculture researchers continue to develop and release high-yielding varieties that are well suited for conditions in Arkansas.

[Narrator] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and was funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county Extension Office.

[Title slide - For more information contact your local county Extension office. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

 

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