UACES Facebook Effects of Storage and Handling Conditions on Soybean Seed Quality - June 4, 2009

Effects of Storage and Handling Conditions on Soybean Seed Quality - June 4, 2009

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video   Script: 

Dr. Rick Cartwright - Extension Plant Pathologist
Julie Robinson - Program Associate

[Title Slide - Effects of Storage and Handling Conditions on Soybean Seed Quality, Dr. Rick Cartwright, Extension Plant Pathologist, Number 3 - June 4, 2009, Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

[Dr. Cartwright] Hi, I'm Dr. Rick Cartwright, Plant Pathologist with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and today we will talk about another aspect of soybean seed quality in Arkansas with Julie Robinson.

[Julie Robinson] Hi, I'm Julie Robinson, Program Associate for the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and today I am going to talk about our research on the effect of storage and handling conditions on the quality of soybean planting seed in Arkansas.

[Slide - Maintaining Seed Quality; Good seed is the foundation for a good crop; Difficult to maintain quality between harvest in the fall and planting the next spring or summer; Arkansas' changing weather conditions make this difficult. Picture of soybean pods. ] Good seed is the foundation for a good soybean crop, but maintaining seed quality between seed harvest in the fall and delivery to soybean farmers the following spring and summer under Arkansas' varying weather conditions is sometimes difficult. [Pictures showing ice covered trees and power poles and hail covered ground and building.] This is probably especially true for seed [Picture of seed stored in a warehouse.] sold in late May and June of each year, [Picture of 8 bags of seed stored in a barn on the farm.] because it has been stored the longest and warehouse or on-farm conditions can get very warm that time of year.

[Slide - Seed Storage Project; two varieties of seed, late M G 3 and M G 4; three participating facilities - Cache River Valley Seed Company, Cullum Seed Company, Hornbeck Seed Company. For this project, we monitor seed of late MG3 and MG4 soybean varieties. Participating facilities are Cache River Valley Seed Company in Cash [Picture of Cache River Valley Seed building and sign.], Cullum Seed Company in Waldenburg [Picture of Cullum Seeds building and sign.], and Hornbeck Seed Company in DeWitt [Picture of Hornbeck Seed, Inc. sign. H B K Seed 888-425-7333.]. Bags of each variety were placed in three different storage situations at each site. [Pictures of two different brand of seeds, Armor and Delta King. Picture of soybean pods.]

[Slide - Storage Conditions; Good, Bad, Farm. Picture of soybean pods.] Situations at each location include good, bad and on-farm conditions. [Slide - Good Storage Condition; Defined as the most ideal storage location within a warehouse. Picture of soybean pods.] Good means a warehouse location with the best temperature control where as [Slide - Bad Storage Condition; Defined as the least ideal storage location within a warehouse. Picture of soybean pods.] bad means a warehouse site where seed can be stored in the winter but must be removed prior to the end of April due to unacceptable high temperatures. [Slide - Farm Storage Condition; Similar to any on farm storage situation. Picture of soybean pods.] On-farm represents an open shed or enclosed shop where seed might be stored temporarily prior to planting, but exposed more to the elements than warehouse-stored seed. [Picture of 8 bags of soybean seed stored on a pallet in a shed.]

[Picture of a Watch Dog data logger on a bag of soybean seed.] Small, electronic temperature and humidity monitors were placed in selected bags of each variety per storage condition around April 1 [Slide - Data Loggers; Placed in bags of seed; Data collected April 1 thru August; Records temperature and relative humidity every hour. Picture of soybean pods.] and will remain in place until August. These monitors log a reading every hour. [Line chart showing results of data collected in seed room number 1.] At the conclusion of this project all the recorded data will be downloaded onto a computer.

[Slide - Seed Sampling; Samples are taken every two weeks; Samples are tested for standard germ, accelerated aging; and seed vigor index. Picture of soybean pods.] Seed samples are taken every two weeks and analyzed for germ, accelerated aging and seed vigor index.

[Picture of seed sample bag in comparison to a 12 ounce soda can.] Samples are collected in standard seed sample bags, and held in controlled temperature ice chests or under air-conditioned conditions at all times. [Slide - How the samples are handled; Samples are held in temperature controlled ice chests; A monitor is placed with the samples to monitor temperature; Samples are split. Picture of soybean pods.] Electronic monitors are placed with the samples to record temperature data until samples are split and delivered to each lab. [Slide - Testing; State Plant Board, Standard Germ, Accelerated Aging; University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, S V I S. Picture of soybean pods.] Samples are analyzed at the State Plant Board for Standard Germination and Accelerated Aging, and at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville seed lab for seed vigor index using the SVIS system.

[Slide - S V I S; Computer Vision System; Correlates well with other tests; Samples can be processed more quickly. Picture of soybean pods.] SVIS is a computer vision system developed by The Ohio State University and [Picture of a researcher testing seed samples.] the index correlates well with other seed vigor tests, but it can be processed faster [Picture of germinated seeds.] and a permanent test record image is stored on the computer for each sample.

[Slide - What we hope to learn; Better storage conditions and methods; Ways to preserve germ and vigor. Picture of soybean pods.] Results from this study should provide data that can be used to develop better storage methods to preserve the germ and [Picture of a soybean field.] vigor of soybean seed under Arkansas' environmental conditions.

Announcer

[Narrator] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and was funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county Extension Office. [Title slide - For more information contact your local county Extension office. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

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