UACES Facebook Burndown Herbicide Program in Soybean - March 10, 2010

Burndown Herbicide Program in Soybean - March 10, 2010

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video   Script:

[Title Slide – Burndown Herbicide Program in Soybean. With Dr. Bob Scott, Extension Weed Specialist. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

[Dr. Bob Scott] Burndown herbicides have become a major consideration for most Arkansas growers. This time of year, March, standing out here in this field [video showing field], it’s ready for a burndown herbicide application. The purpose for burndown herbicides is to provide removal of all the winter vegetation, undesirable weeds that are out here at this time.

[Dr. Bob Scott] A lot of times growers will choose to add a residual herbicide in with their burndown product to help get from this time until planting time. And burndown herbicides have also become a lot more important in the state as we increase our no-till production acres.

[Video showing a tractor in the field] When we talk about burndown herbicides in Arkansas we are primarily talking about these non-selective herbicides [Slide - Burndown Herbicides - Non-selective, residual - glyphosate], Roundup®, Ignite herbicide, and Gromoxone herbicide and again these provide a broad spectrum control.

[Dr. Bob Scott] A lot of times a choice of herbicide depends on what crop the grower is going to plant, it also can depend on the type of weeds that are present in the field.

One major burndown concern that we have in Arkansas is getting control of our glyphosate resistant horseweed [Map of the state of Arkansas with county outlines showing the counties with glyphosate resistant weeds]. This horseweed has evolved over the past few years to be resistant to the herbicide glyphosate, which again is a major herbicide for us in burndown.

[Picture of a plant that has burned down] University data has shown that eight ounces of Clarity and sometimes a quart of 2-4D will provide adequate control of this pest. [Slide - for glyphosate resistance: - 8 ounces of dicamba, - 1 quart of 2-4D, - Watch plant-back intervals]. One thing about using dicamba and 2-4D in a burndown is you have to watch the plant-back intervals.

[Picture of front cover of the MP-44 – Recommended Chemicals for Weed and Brush Control publication.] All of this information is available in our MP-44 – Recommended Chemicals for Weed and Brush which is available on the UAEX website. [Screen shot showing the MP-44 web address http://www.uaex.edu/publications/MP-44.aspx] In addition to that a lot of growers again choose to add a residual herbicide [picture showing a wheat field plot where a residual herbicide has been used] to their burndown program. Typically for horseweed we recommend Valor or one of the Valor containing premixes is an excellent option for horseweed [Picture of a horseweed in the rosette stage], this can be applied up to thirty days prior to planting any crop and up to immediately prior to planting soybeans.

[Dr. Bob Scott] In addition to glyphosate resistant horseweed, we also have identified at least one population of glyphosate resistant ryegrass in the state. And we definitely suspect that there are others. [Video showing young ryegrass] Ryegrass again is a grass-weed typically infest in the borders of the field.

[Dr. Bob Scott] What we have observed in our control studies is that we can overcome glyphosate resistance [Picture showing two plots side by side, one treated with herbicide and one without] by adding twelve ounces of SelectMax or possibly changing burndown programs and [Dr. Bob Scott] going with a Gromoxone program and tank mixing that with either Syncore or diruon for increased efficacy.

[Narrator] Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast is a production of the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture and was funded in part by the Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your local county Extension Office.

[Title slide - For more information contact your local county Extension office. Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board]

 

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