UACES Facebook Arkansas Edamame Field Day 2013 - October 2013

Arkansas Edamame Field Day 2013 - October 2013

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video  Script:

[Narrator] The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture scientists offered the latest in edamame research during a field day at the vegetable research station near Alma. [Video shows people participating in edamame field day.]

[Dr. John Rupe, professor, Department of Plant Pathology University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. U of A University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.]

[Dr. John Rupe talking to field day participants] “We have three tests here. We’re all concerned with preserving seed quality, either through identifying resistance to fungal pathogens or the use of fungicide to protect the seed. This year we lucked out and we got frog-eye leaf spot, a foliar pathogen, it’s becoming more important in the last few years and we were able to get some good efficacy data on that. [Pictures of plant leaves with frog-eye leaf spot.] The best fungicide we had was ALTO®, which is a cyproconazole, a triazole, it was quite effective.  What’s important about that is, the other class of fungicides we have is the strobilurins, things like Headline® or Quadris®, this fungus, the frog-eye leaf spot pathogen, has developed resistant to. We don’t know whether the isolates we got from this field are resistant, but we know in eastern Arkansas there are a number of counties that have resistant strains of that. So that makes those fungicides ineffective against frog-eye. So having another class of fungicide available for control is pretty important.”

[Narrator]: Industry experts were on hand to answer questions, present reports on their research and to announce new developments at the JYC food soybean processing plant. [Video shows experts answering questions.]

[Raymond P. Chung, co-owner and CFO, American Vegetable Soybean and Edamame. U of A University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.]

[Raymond Chung talking to field day participants] “This is one of the new products that we developed; this one still uses China edamame. Because we don’t have a freeze drying facility here yet in Arkansas, but this is a freeze-dried edamame, and when you freeze-dry something, you preserve its nutrients, and protein, and all the vitamins and it also preserves the flavor and the color, and we found that there were quite a number of people who really enjoy this. And we added flavoring to it, to create a nice portable snack. And we’re selling it all over, stores across the U.S. and actually exporting it … already. We are exporting it to Asia, a customer in Australia wants it too, so this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are a lot of other things that we can do with this. Edamame s fundamentally is soybeans, so it is very versatile crops. [Chung shows product Cruncha Ma Me.]

[Voice of Kelly Cartwright] Ray that product though, it is put together there in Mulberry.

[Raymond Chung] “That’s right, we just get the raw materials -- the raw material, the freeze-dried edamame from China, all the other ingredients, the seasonings, the oil are sourced in the U.S. and we do all the quality control, all the seasoning and packaging in Mulberry.  You know the most important thing that has really allowed us to succeed here is really the support we have gotten from growers, as well as the state and the university. The state has provided us with the financing for the plant and they just approved another financing, $3.6 million and we’re going to use that to expand the plant. And should get that done by hopefully, the beginning of next year, and ready for the next season.

[For more information on Arkansas edamame visit www.uaex.edu. U of A University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.]

[Voice source unknown] “We’re going to try freezing them?

[Raymond Chung]: “We’re going to be drying them, uh freeze-dry, there’s another process I’m looking at too that could be pretty interesting.”

 

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