UACES Facebook Harvesting Organic Edamame - October 2012

Harvesting Organic Edamame - October 2012

You Tube - Link to watch video on You Tube.Link to transcript

Audio/Video Script:

[University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System. Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. Shawn Peebles, Arkansas Edamame Producer, White County]

[Video shows edamame being harvested and edamame plants with bean pods.]

My name is Shawn Peebles. We grow organic crops, predominately edamame here on this farm.  

 

Today we’re harvesting. We got two pickers running. We started today. Hopefully we’ll get 15-20 acres out today and continue on from this point.

 

 

[Slide] How long have you been a producer?

I’ve been a producer all my life. This is probably my 20th crop. Second crop of organic. We started organic last year. (Of) course this is the first year for the edamame.  [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field and a picker in the field harvesting.]

 

[Slide] Are there any challenges growing organic?

The organic is different. The edamame is a sweeter crop than a soybean, so insects like it more. [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field.]

 

[Slide] What was your main focus this year?

Predominately just keeping the irrigation on it. It likes a lot of water. On a dry year like we’ve had this year, that was probably the biggest challenge we had was keeping it wet. It cannot get stressed. [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field and harvested edamame being dumped into trailers.]

 

[Slide] What is different about growing edamame?

Not much different from raising soybeans, more intensive, more like a vegetable crop than a soybean in that respect. More delicate. We watched it on a daily basis. [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field and pickers in the field harvesting.]

 

[Slide] Are there any differences when harvesting edamame?

The harvest for the edamame is a lot slower than soybean harvest. Of course it’s harvested as a green crop. But in general, you probably are going to harvest at about one-fifth of the rate that you would of a soybean crop. [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field and a combine in the field harvesting.]

 

[Slide] What advice do you have for future edamame growers?

The only advice I would give would be proactive. Don’t, we always seem to wait a little while until we see worms or bugs or insects on our soybeans. Then we spray when we’re at threshold. The thresholds are much, much lower with edamame.  You need to act in a very proactive way. When you think you’ve got insect problems, you probably need to be managing that problem then. [Video shows Shawn standing next to a field, a person tarping the trailer, and a truck transporting the harvested edamame out of the field.]

 

For more information on edamame production, check the website www.uaex.edu.

 

[University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System. Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board www.uaex.edu]

 

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