UACES Facebook Soil Chlorides Starting to Show Up - June 2012

Soil Chlorides Starting to Show Up - June 2012

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Audio/Video Script:

[Video shows various pictures of soybean fields with specialists or agents in fields. Music plays in the background]

[Title Slide – Soil Chlorides Starting to Show Up Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast. Presented by University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board.]

Hello. My name is Brent Griffin with the Prairie County Cooperative Extension Service. Today we are in a field east of Des Arc looking at our soybean crop, evaluating what we have and one thing I want to kind of discuss and touch with today is soil chlorides that are starting to show up in our soybean crop.  [Brent Griffin, Staff Chair, Cooperative Extension Service, Prairie County stands in a soybean field.]

One of the issues with soil chlorides this year due to the dry weather is the wicking up on the beds.  And I’ve got a few plants here that are exhibiting symptoms of soil chlorides. [Video shows soybean plants in a field.]

In soybeans, we have two types of plants or traits through the genetics. One being includers, the other being excluders.  An includer is a plant that will pull the chloride out of the soil, take it into the roots, translocate it throughout of the plant stem and up into the leaves, giving this burning effect.  [Brent shows a soybean plant with browning leaves.]

In dealing with soil chlorides, the one cultural way that we can manage this issue in our soybeans is to select a cultivar or variety of soybeans that is an excluder. The excluder soybean plants or varieties actually hold the chlorides that are absorbed through the roots, in the roots and will not translocate throughout the plant.

We have three principle ways of dealing with our soil chlorides here in the state.  One is selecting an excluder variety. The other way is by mechanical ways of deep tillage in the fall or winter to help leach out the chlorides that are in the soil, and then the third way is those fields that have a history of chloride issues in soybeans, and especially those fields that have high need of commercial fertilizers, those fields should be fertilized in the fall, worked in, worked into the soil, that a way by the time the fertilizer dissolves in the soil, the chlorides will be able to leach out for the upcoming year.

[Title slide – Your Arkansas Soybean Podcast. Video shows various pictures of soybean fields with specialists or agents in fields. U of A Division of Agriculture Research and Extension University of Arkansas System, Arkansas Soybean Promotion Board. For more information on soybean farming in Arkansas contact your county extension office. ]

 

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